Urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa: Access to Electricity

The centrepiece of the evolution of any city is access to electricity. However, this basic element of modern life, and what most of the people take for granted, does not reach a large proportion of the population living in Sub-Saharan Africa. Only 40% of the people in that region have access to electricity. This number gets even smaller in the rural areas, where less than 25% of the population can turn on a lamp at night (Figure 1). This is the third article of the “Urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa” series, following “City Master Plans” and “Affordable Housing.”

Urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa: Affordable Housing

The growing urban population in Sub-Saharan Africa is rapidly driving up the demand for affordable housing in urban areas. On the one hand, there is the opportunity to build a more inclusive future, where every citizen has a decent house to call home. With the right policies and focused implementation, cities can concentrate businesses and services such as schools, hospitals and police, which allow more people to enjoy them. On the other hand, there is the difficulty of building infrastructure at a faster pace than that of the growth of the urban population, and of revamping slums and poorly planned areas. This is the second article on the “Urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa” series, following the “City Master Plans” article.

Urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa: City Master Plans

Sub-Saharan Africa is undergoing a wave of changes as its urban population grows in an unprecedented pace. Since the beginning of the century, the urban population in the region grew by more than 200 million.
Among the companies engaged in this transformation, we have Surbana Jurong, Hyflux and Meinhardt: three Singapore companies prominent in the infrastructure business.

LNG in Mozambique

Updated on 29th June 2018 Article published at the China-Lusophone Brief, on 21st March 2018 Article also published in How We Made it in Africa, on 24th May 2018 Also published at the NTU-SBF Centre for African Studies, on 25th May 2018 Mozambique, which gained independence from Portugal in 1975, is home to a culturally…

Lessons from Singapore Companies in Sub-Saharan Africa

Over the past few years, business leaders and investors have become increasingly aware of the economic potential of Sub-Saharan Africa’s burgeoning consumer market. Singapore is an increasingly interested player in the Sub-Saharan African arena. There is a growing number of Singapore companies, from small to large, drawn to the region.They venture not only to familiar South Africa, but are also attracted by the blossoming tech industry in East Africa and by the booming population in West Africa, which brings the promise of a huge untapped market.

Smart Cities in Africa: Nairobi and Cape Town

Smart cities leverage on technology and use the large amount of data their citizens generate every second to optimize resources, to connect people and to improve business and trading. A smart city targets energy savings and adopts environmentally friendly technologies, which helps promoting sustainable development.
Nairobi and Cape Town rank among the most advanced cities on the African continent on the smart city front. Nairobi, capital of Kenya and home to over 3 million people, won the title of Most Intelligent City in Africa for two years in a row. Going south, Cape Town blossoms as one of the best places to do business in the continent as the South African government continuously implements thoughtful planning and cutting edge technology to attract businesses and improve the lives of its citizens. Both Nairobi and Cape Town look at Singapore as a role model for the city of the future.

What Africa can Expect from the US in Foreign Policy

In the wake of controversial picks for Trump’s cabinet, the spotlight turns to his appointed choice for Secretary of State, the highest diplomatic rank in the United States government. After a brief interlude with Mitt Romney, which would certainly be a favourite pick among Republicans, Donald Trump showed that he would continue with his anti-establishment agenda and decided instead to recommend Rex Tillerson for the role.

Rex Tillerson is an experienced executive of the Oil and Gas industry, with 41 years working in ExxonMobil. Tillerson ascended to become the company’s chairman and CEO in 2006, roles that he occupied until the end of 2016 when he finally left the company. He was nominated US Secretary of State on early February.

However, more than one month into the role, a large number of vacancies in the US State Department are still to be filled. Adding this to the isolationist rhetoric Trump has preaching and to the recent proposed cut in funding to the State Department make one think that American foreign affairs will not be a top priority in the Trump presidency.